Relocation Limbo

I got my visa nearly a month ago and I still haven’t left the country. Even though I have a visa and employment pass, I can’t just leave the country without exit papers. Before I could get that on my end, I needed papers to get processed in the Philippine Embassy in Malaysia. That entire process took three weeks because they needed to send me something via courier for my signature, which I then had to send back — a process that takes two days each way, but longer if it went through the weekend. So, they sent me papers to sign, I received it, signed it, and sent it back, then they realised they needed me to sign something else because the scanned copy I’d sent wasn’t acceptable to the embassy. When they finally had everything, it took a few days for the embassy to release the papers I needed to apply for the exit papers here. I got my visa on June 6th, and I got the Philippine Embassy papers on June 27th.

That same day, I went to POEA (Philippine Overseas Employment Agency) to get my exit papers — something called the OEC (Overseas Employment Certificate). I tried to get it the same way I’d got it last time, but I was told that since I hadn’t actually started working for my employer, I couldn’t get it that way and had to go to a different office to get it. So, I went to the office, submitted my papers, and I was told that I needed to submit more documents.

They wanted my university diploma, transcript of records, CV, certificates of employment from two previous employers, and a written statement saying how I came across the job and how I got the job — notarised.

I couldn’t believe it. They were asking for credentials that my employer had already checked and deemed acceptable to hire me, why was this necessary? So I asked if I would receive the OEC after submitting all these extra documents and was told, no, it would take around two to three weeks to process. If asking for additional documents was a slap on the face, this information was a punch in the gut.

I was originally meant to start my new job in the first week of June, but after all the delays, my new start date was moved to the 28th — the following day, basically. I was pretty much told that there was nothing I could do except submit the additional required documents and wait for approval.

Disbelief was probably an understatement at that point. Here I was, on the brink of starting a job with my dream employer — a well-known, reputable, international company — and subsequently having my country slam the door on my face.

I’m a patient person, for the most part. But if I’m told to wait for something incredibly, unbelievably stupid and unnecessary, it becomes a problem. It’s frustrating. More so when you know that there’s absolutely nothing that you can do and that your fate basically lies in the hands of people who don’t care what happens to you.

The incredulity did not stop there. When I went back to submit the “required” documents they asked for, I was told that I needed to attend a seminar as another requirement. It’s basically someone talking about what life abroad is like, what to expect, what to do, how to conduct yourself, and so on. I’ve been living and working abroad for over two years. This honestly does not apply to me. The woman handling my papers tells me to just take it since it’s free anyway. I don’t care that it’s free. I care that you’re telling me to go waste my time doing something that’s completely unnecessary.

But wait, there’s more. She tells me I also need a medical check-up. I tell her that I’ve already done one for the visa and employment pass. I show her the papers and she sees that it was done back in April. She then tells me that it’s not acceptable because medical check-ups are only valid for three months. So I argue that it technically hasn’t been three months since the check-up, to which she retorts that it will be by the time my papers are processed and approved.

I understand that Filipino workers are taken advantage of and abused in many places. I understand that this process and these requirements are in place to protect workers from scams and human trafficking, but there has to be an exception somewhere when applicable.

There is no job in the Philippines in my line of work that will compensate me the way jobs abroad can. If there were, I wouldn’t be leaving. My family is here. I don’t voluntarily live abroad on my own for fun. I don’t send my salary home for fun. I’m willing to bet that every Filipino working abroad will tell you the same thing.

My case is by no means unique. There were other people there pleading for their OECs because they were already at risk of losing their jobs. The only thing they needed was one person’s signature. One signature to get them a piece of paper to allow them to leave the country and work. It didn’t matter that their flights were booked. It didn’t matter that they were about to lose their jobs. They were told to wait.

If we lose our jobs because of this, nobody is going to compensate us for all the money we’ve already spent on all the paperwork we’ve done. Nobody is going to reimburse them for their flights. Nobody is going to offer us an alternative job with the same benefits. Sorry nalang.

Correct me if I’m wrong, but I feel like a country should be helping its people to get ahead in life and not preventing them from good opportunities.

 

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